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Now I am enjoying some papers guided by CCK09 week 6 Complex adaptive systems. I found the wonderful sites of  SantaFe Institute, really easy and motivating to use. They will be my favourite sites…

Another source worth of reading in my opinion is Francis Heylighen, Free University of Brussels. He deals with complexity and information overload in society: why increasing efficiency leads to decreasing control. It is possible to predict causal effects but not human behavior. The amount of information in society and the speed followed by open publications increase and we get data smog that covers real knowledge. We have tools to organise flows of informations but here is again the overload, the overload of opportunities. I don’t know how to find any valuable from my Google Reader or iGoogle or Twitter, but I find a lot of data smog all the time.

It is a paradox that the only way to use complex and open systems is to make them more simple and restricted. So I build a system of  ‘people I can trust’ in my mind and choose what and whom  to follow. But if I have never time to read or think I can follow many wrong prophets. One of the problems is that those who know only technology have a strong voice in social media and others can follow them quite blindly. This is a bubble of social media that is good to see, I opened my eyes while participating in a discussion in Finnish last week. Young guys take the power with poor understanding of substance things, they have done it some years because it seems normal to other participants. This means losing control and unpredictable influences. There is no friction in tweets, nuisance is open to everybody so let’s use it to be postmodern up-to-date people  :)

To understand developmental dialectics is needed again: every property and opportunity turns to its opposite and you should be careful and open all the time ,which is impossible. Thanks to F. Heylighen who deepened my thinking and gave me devices to see what’s happening. And thanks to open CCK09 which seem to be an excellent orienting course (source?) to knowledge and connections needed to .. what? to live and learn and participate today.

6 Responses to “Complex and open – simple and secret?”

  1. [...] Brussels who helped me in this, I found serious research what to follow. It was the week about chaos and complex, I hadn’t find the source without [...]

  2. [...] I remember my own post titled Complex and open – simple and secret.Learning means to find insights as many times as necessary. In a video of Dave Snowden (given by [...]

  3. Hi Heli,
    I strongly resonate with your view: “So I build a system of ‘people I can trust’ in my mind and choose what and whom to follow. But if I have never time to read or think I can follow many wrong prophets. One of the problems is that those who now only technology have a strong voice in social media and others can follow them quite blindly.” This makes me think more “critically” about the message behind posts in social media, rather than accepting the ideas without filtering. “Young guys take the power with poor understanding of substance things, they have done it some years because it seems normal to other participants.” That’s on one hand worrying, as we have seen young people could easily be absored into the abusive power or illusive wisdom in their voices (like the 4Chan, which is an uncensored, mature website filled with racism, sexism, and spams, & I always to stay away from suc), and injecting “evils” into the internet. On the other hand, I think this adds to our understanding that within the social media, internet, there are always other sides of the perspectives – good & evils, day & night that always evolves as a way of life. A metaphor is in a bubble of social media, we have the inside and outside, and the bubble membrane is what separates us from the reality, because we are living in a virtual bubble that keep on bursting, only to see the next bubble is within the existing ones.
    We need both yin/yang to evolve in a society, and it seems to be a natural phenomena.
    A society will always have judges, lawyers, doctors, nurses, policemen, firemen, and educators. Why? They are important people to serve the society, the people. Each has a role to play, to maintain the status quo of the evolving system, to uphold the values of society, and they are all inter-connected to each other in one way or the other. Education, learning is just part of the connections in the ecology.
    I think this leave us to reflect on the reality, that without these people, the society would fall into another social bubble that would have membranes that separates us from the outside world, leaving us in isolation, with no or little connection.
    John

  4. Ruth Howard says:

    Hi Heli my experience is that the Internet has a strong capacity to mirror the mind of the observer but this is often not conscious, thus the aspect of serendipity and also the split (in my mind) between viewing the net as utopian or dystopian.

    This mirroring of the mind is my experience offline too (but it appears magnified in this online environment). I can experience it directly interacting with people/nature/machines and through picking up a book.

    It’s my practice right now to allow for them both, the duality, they can coexist and motivate me to dig a bit deeper.

  5. Mary says:

    Hi Heli,

    It was wonderful to read your substantive, coherent post, “Complex and Open-Secret and Simple?” I, too, reflect on the readings and the discussions in CCK08 and CCK09 as I am reading the material and the posts and listening to the presentations in CritLit2010. As I am reading the material in blogs, I am toggling back and forth between the Handbooks of Research and the bloggers. I learn from both sources, differently.

    How should we apprehend and comprehend complexity? Should we loosen the ties? Should we harden the categories? Do we forge bonds or build circuits of recognition?

    One author I enjoy very much is Philippe Fernandos Armesto. He is a philosopher of history at Oxford. One book that he wrote that I particularly enjoy is Truth: A Guide for the Perplexed in Postmodern Times. Armesto stresses the importance of using truth-seeking methods to determine if something is good or bad, true or false, and in the book he suggests that there are four truth-seeking methods–”the truth we feel,” “the truth we have been told,” “the truth we reason for ourselves,” and “the truth of sense or science.” I find that these four methods come in handy when I am interacting in networks, whether these networks are kith and kin or nodes and nings.

  6. heli says:

    Thanks for comments, John, Ruth and Mary!

    Just now I feel myself confused – in the beginning of CritLit2010 pragmatics week but I have a hunch that here is something in this chain. Living in real and virtual life, my older mind and today-mind with help of yours…